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About

Always growing older - never growing up.

Eclectic random geekery: Star Wars, Doctor Who, Sci-Fi, science, photography, LEGO, and stupid, stupid things.

This is my personal opinion / reblogging blog. If you're after my personal photos or awful photoshop creations, the links are below.

(waves his hand as he smiles knowingly)...

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Move along.

WEB LINKS

My other Tumblr blogs, and elsewhere on the web I is...

Looking Through A Glass Cumquat   (Original Photos)
Tasteless & Unoriginal (Photoshop)
Twitter
Articles+Reviews @ Snarkhunters

OTHER LINKY THINGS

Ask away! 
All My Original Posts (inc rants)
Tumblrs I've ♥'ed

LIKE YOU CARE...

As they say in the classics "I'm too old for this shit".

That said, I live in sunny Brisbane (Australia), forging a career in advertising / marketing whilst enjoying life as it comes.

I take photos on my iPhone, listen to (a lot of) music on my iPhone, and like Star Wars. So yes, I'm a geek.

That's about it.

Party on!

TUMBLRING SINCE AUG 2010

Following

6 February 12 (Permalink)
Clydagh Castle taken on a dark night allowing the stars to shine in all their glory. Photo by Conor Ledwith (AKA The Finch)

Clydagh Castle taken on a dark night allowing the stars to shine in all their glory.
Photo by Conor Ledwith (AKA The Finch)

Reblogged: braveszone

31 August 11 (Permalink)
darthambiguous:

My 41st birthday was a magical occasion. Just me, my wifey, my mum & one of my sisters. This astonishing view greeted us as we were about to head off for dinner, and on our return we all gazed at the milky way and saw a shooting star! This is going to be a great year :)

darthambiguous:

My 41st birthday was a magical occasion. Just me, my wifey, my mum & one of my sisters. This astonishing view greeted us as we were about to head off for dinner, and on our return we all gazed at the milky way and saw a shooting star! This is going to be a great year :)

Reblogged: darthambiguous

31 July 11 (Permalink)
A Tale of Two Hemispheres //  by Tunç Tezel and Stéphane Guisard (TWAN)
Top: Northern hemisphere’s Canary Island (Roque de los Muchachos Observatory)Bottom: Southern hemisphere’s Atacama Desert (Paranal Observatory, Chile)

A Tale of Two Hemispheres //  by Tunç Tezel and Stéphane Guisard (TWAN)

Top: Northern hemisphere’s Canary Island (Roque de los Muchachos Observatory)
Bottom: Southern hemisphere’s Atacama Desert (Paranal Observatory, Chile)

5 July 11 (Permalink)

Ocean Sky from Alex Cherney on Vimeo.

Southern Ocean Sky
Image Credit & Copyright: Alex Cherney (Terrastro); Music: Redmann

Clouds and sky both show illuminating changes during this time lapse video from the south of Australia. In the foreground are scenes visible over a rocky coastline toward the Southern Ocean.

Dark clouds flow across the sky, sometimes from different directions, sometimes blocking background starlight, but other times causing stars to appear to flare as they move in front.

In the first sequence, looking toward the southwest, a nearly vertical band of zodiacal light is seen at sunset just before the band of the Milky Way Galaxy appears to settle into the sea.

Soon the unusual dark patch of the Coal Sack Nebula can be seen on the Milky Way band, near the famous Southern Cross.

Later, looking toward the southeast at about 2:10 in the video, Orion can be seen rising appearing nearly perpendicular to how it rises in northern skies.

The composite video, winner of an award STARMUS astrophotography competition, took over a year to compile in 2009 and 2010 from over 30 hours of exposure. 

(Source: apod.nasa.gov)

11 May 11 (Permalink)
peteuplink:

Wonder and Mystery above the Very Large Telescopes Credit: Yuri Beletsky (ESO)
Explanation: What’s that bright orange dot above the large telescope on the right? Even seasoned sky enthusiasts might ponder the origin of the orange orb seen byscrolling across this panoramic image, taken last December. Perhaps identifying known objects will help. To start, on the far left is a diagonal band of light known aszodiacal light, sunlight reflected off of dust orbiting in the inner Solar System. The bright white spot on the left, just above the horizon, is Venus, which also glows by reflected sunlight. Rising diagonally from the ground to the right of Venus is the band of our Milky Way Galaxy. In the image, the band, which usually stretches dramatically overhead, appears to arch above the elevated Chilean landscape. Under the Milky Way arch, toward the left, lie both the Large and Small Magellanic Cloud galaxies, while toward the right lies the constellation of Orion surrounded by the red ring of Barnard’s Loop. On the ground, each of the four Very Large Telescopes is busy keeping an eye on the distant universe. The orange spot — it’s the Moon. The image was taken during a total lunar eclipse when the normally bright full moon turned into a faint orb tinted orange by the intervening Earth’s atmosphere.


I’ve never had the desire to travel (even though my friends are adamant that I was born to see the world), but recently I’ve been toying with the idea of visiting Norway / Arctic Circle (to see the Aurora Borealis), or Hawaii to experience the stargazing from Mauna Kea Summit. Now I have to add Chile to the list? Damn!

peteuplink:

Wonder and Mystery above the Very Large Telescopes 
Credit: Yuri Beletsky (ESO)

Explanation: What’s that bright orange dot above the large telescope on the right? Even seasoned sky enthusiasts might ponder the origin of the orange orb seen byscrolling across this panoramic image, taken last December. Perhaps identifying known objects will help. To start, on the far left is a diagonal band of light known aszodiacal light, sunlight reflected off of dust orbiting in the inner Solar System. The bright white spot on the left, just above the horizon, is Venus, which also glows by reflected sunlight. Rising diagonally from the ground to the right of Venus is the band of our Milky Way Galaxy. In the image, the band, which usually stretches dramatically overhead, appears to arch above the elevated Chilean landscape. Under the Milky Way arch, toward the left, lie both the Large and Small Magellanic Cloud galaxies, while toward the right lies the constellation of Orion surrounded by the red ring of Barnard’s Loop. On the ground, each of the four Very Large Telescopes is busy keeping an eye on the distant universe. The orange spot — it’s the Moon. The image was taken during a total lunar eclipse when the normally bright full moon turned into a faint orb tinted orange by the intervening Earth’s atmosphere.

I’ve never had the desire to travel (even though my friends are adamant that I was born to see the world), but recently I’ve been toying with the idea of visiting Norway / Arctic Circle (to see the Aurora Borealis), or Hawaii to experience the stargazing from Mauna Kea Summit. Now I have to add Chile to the list? Damn!

Reblogged: skekoa

13 January 11 (Permalink)

Reblogged: unknownskywalker

4 December 10 (Permalink)
Through the Clouds, Night by Jeddaka

Through the Clouds, Night by Jeddaka

Reblogged: itsfullofstars

9 October 10 (Permalink)
somepg:

Pixiv Image! great one

somepg:

Pixiv Image! great one

(Source: fuckyeahpixiv)

Reblogged: somepg

22 September 10 (Permalink)

Reblogged: potentpoison

Posted: 2:12 AM (Permalink)
itsfullofstars:

WATCH THE AURORA BOREALIS LIVE!
The Canadian Space Agency, Astronomy North, the University of Calgary, and the city of Yellowknife have partnered up to create the AuroraMAX Online Observatory

AuroraMAX Alerts provide advanced notice of the aurora by monitoring the daily aurora forecast on Astronomy North and by monitoring the latest space weather data and solar activity news and information. [source]

You can even check out their Solar Activity Forecast to see when you’ll have the best chances of seeing Aurora activity and actually watch it live online.
A cool thing I found through those sites is this continuously updated map of the Auroral oval over the North Pole.

itsfullofstars:

WATCH THE AURORA BOREALIS LIVE!

The Canadian Space Agency, Astronomy North, the University of Calgary, and the city of Yellowknife have partnered up to create the AuroraMAX Online Observatory

AuroraMAX Alerts provide advanced notice of the aurora by monitoring the daily aurora forecast on Astronomy North and by monitoring the latest space weather data and solar activity news and information. [source]

You can even check out their Solar Activity Forecast to see when you’ll have the best chances of seeing Aurora activity and actually watch it live online.

A cool thing I found through those sites is this continuously updated map of the Auroral oval over the North Pole.

Reblogged: itsfullofstars

21 September 10 (Permalink)
itsfullofstars:

Aurora Over NorwayCredit & Copyright: Ole Christian Salomonsen
Explanation: Auroras can make spectacular sights. Photographed above last weekend, flowing multi-colored auroras helped illuminate a busy sky above Tromsø, Norway. Besides the spectacular aurora pictured above, the photographer caught three satellites streaks, one airplane streak, and a friend trying to capture the same sight. Although auroras might first appear to be moonlit clouds, they only add light to the sky and do not block background stars from view. Called northern lights in the northern hemisphere, auroras are caused by collisions between charged particles from the magnetosphere and air molecules high in the Earth’s atmosphere. If viewed from space, auroras can be seen to glow in X-ray and ultraviolet light as well. Predictable auroras might occur a few days after a powerful magnetic event has been seen on the Sun.

One day I will see this with my own eyes

itsfullofstars:

Aurora Over Norway
Credit & Copyright: Ole Christian Salomonsen

Explanation: Auroras can make spectacular sights. Photographed above last weekend, flowing multi-colored auroras helped illuminate a busy sky above TromsøNorway. Besides the spectacular aurora pictured above, the photographer caught three satellites streaks, one airplane streak, and a friend trying to capture the same sight. Although auroras might first appear to be moonlit clouds, they only add light to the sky and do not block background stars from view. Called northern lights in the northern hemisphere, auroras are caused by collisions between charged particles from the magnetosphere and air molecules high in the Earth’s atmosphere. If viewed from space, auroras can be seen to glow in X-ray and ultraviolet light as well. Predictable auroras might occur a few days after a powerful magnetic event has been seen on the Sun.

One day I will see this with my own eyes

Reblogged: itsfullofstars

Posted: 12:34 AM (Permalink)
myarchipelago:

A visual reminder that even in the coldest and darkest of places, beauty can be found.

myarchipelago:

A visual reminder that even in the coldest and darkest of places, beauty can be found.

(Source: ofamaranthlie)

Reblogged: potentpoison

19 September 10 (Permalink)
toodrivetodrunk:

by David Hogan

toodrivetodrunk:

by David Hogan

Posted: 10:55 AM (Permalink)

(Source: vividvisuals)

Reblogged: potentpoison

Themed by Hunson. Originally by Josh & tweaked like crazy by Darth Ambiguous