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Always growing older - never growing up.

Eclectic random geekery: Star Wars, Doctor Who, Sci-Fi, science, photography, LEGO, and stupid, stupid things.

This is my personal opinion / reblogging blog. If you're after my personal photos or awful photoshop creations, the links are below.

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LIKE YOU CARE...

As they say in the classics "I'm too old for this shit".

That said, I live in sunny Brisbane (Australia), forging a career in advertising / marketing whilst enjoying life as it comes.

I take photos on my iPhone, listen to (a lot of) music on my iPhone, and like Star Wars. So yes, I'm a geek.

That's about it.

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TUMBLRING SINCE AUG 2010

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16 November 11 (Permalink)
unknownskywalker:

Montage
This montage of New Horizons images shows Jupiter and its volcanic moon Io, and were taken during the spacecraft’s Jupiter flyby in early 2007. The image of Jupiter is an infrared color composite that highlights variations in the altitude of the Jovian cloud tops, with blue denoting high-altitude clouds and hazes, and red indicating deeper clouds. The prominent bluish-white oval is the Great Red Spot.
The image of Io is an approximately true-color composite and shows a major eruption in progress on the night side, at the northern volcano Tvashtar. Incandescent lava glows red beneath a volcanic plume, whose uppermost portions are illuminated by sunlight. The plume appears blue due to scattering of light by small particles within it.

unknownskywalker:

Montage

This montage of New Horizons images shows Jupiter and its volcanic moon Io, and were taken during the spacecraft’s Jupiter flyby in early 2007. The image of Jupiter is an infrared color composite that highlights variations in the altitude of the Jovian cloud tops, with blue denoting high-altitude clouds and hazes, and red indicating deeper clouds. The prominent bluish-white oval is the Great Red Spot.

The image of Io is an approximately true-color composite and shows a major eruption in progress on the night side, at the northern volcano Tvashtar. Incandescent lava glows red beneath a volcanic plume, whose uppermost portions are illuminated by sunlight. The plume appears blue due to scattering of light by small particles within it.

Reblogged: unknownskywalker

22 August 11 (Permalink)
Dawn approaches Oahu - Hawaii from Space
Dawn approaches Oahu in this true-colour Terra MODIS satellite view of the Hawaiian Islands from 2003.
From lower right to upper left, the “Big Island” (Hawaii), Maui, Kahoolawe, Lanai, Molokai, Oahu, Kauai, and Niihau islands all make up the state of Hawaii, which lies more than 2,000 miles from any other part of the United States of America.
The small red dot on the Big Island’s southeastern side marks the Puʻu ʻŌʻō cone, the Kilauea Volcano’s current hotspot. Kilauea has been erupting almost continuously since January 1983, and is one of the world’s best studied volcanoes.
Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

Dawn approaches Oahu - Hawaii from Space

Dawn approaches Oahu in this true-colour Terra MODIS satellite view of the Hawaiian Islands from 2003.

From lower right to upper left, the “Big Island” (Hawaii), Maui, Kahoolawe, Lanai, Molokai, Oahu, Kauai, and Niihau islands all make up the state of Hawaii, which lies more than 2,000 miles from any other part of the United States of America.

The small red dot on the Big Island’s southeastern side marks the Puʻu ʻŌʻō cone, the Kilauea Volcano’s current hotspot. Kilauea has been erupting almost continuously since January 1983, and is one of the world’s best studied volcanoes.

Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

9 June 11 (Permalink)
travelbyfoldingamap:

ferus-:

The skies above southern Chile the day after an eruption in the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcanic chain. An average of 230 earthquakes an hour were recorded in the region before the eruption, which blew an ash cloud six miles high and produced storms of volcanic lightning (via Eyewitness: Volcanic lightning | World news | The Guardian)

is a photo like this even comprehensible?

Eruptions, Earthquakes, Thunderbolts and Lightning,Very very frightening - me!Galileo (Galileo) Galileo FigaroMagnifico!

travelbyfoldingamap:

ferus-:

The skies above southern Chile the day after an eruption in the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcanic chain. An average of 230 earthquakes an hour were recorded in the region before the eruption, which blew an ash cloud six miles high and produced storms of volcanic lightning (via Eyewitness: Volcanic lightning | World news | The Guardian)

is a photo like this even comprehensible?

Eruptions, Earthquakes, Thunderbolts and Lightning,
Very very frightening - me!
Galileo (Galileo) Galileo Figaro
Magnifico!

Reblogged: travelbyfoldingamap

Posted: 4:47 PM (Permalink)
fadedandblurred:

The eruption of the Puyehue volcano in the Andes mountains of southern Chile last weekend provided some spectacular images of the force of nature.
[via The Big Picture]

fadedandblurred:

The eruption of the Puyehue volcano in the Andes mountains of southern Chile last weekend provided some spectacular images of the force of nature.

[via The Big Picture]


Reblogged: fadedandblurred

29 May 11 (Permalink)
skekoa:

This is daylight near the Icelandic volcano.

skekoa:

This is daylight near the Icelandic volcano.

Reblogged: skekoa

30 April 11 (Permalink)

Reblogged: shology

1 February 11 (Permalink)

Mount Shinmoedake erupts - photos via SMH

28 January 11 (Permalink)
shogunpassion:

shogunushuaia: Volcano by Garcia Foto


The picture is taken just outside a small fishing village on the island Senja in Northern Norway. The mountains in the picture raise to about 800 meters above sea level, and they are actually much steeper than suggested by the distorted ultra-wide-angle perspective presented here.
As always, the patient one is eventually rewarded. I have been looking for these conditions for quite some time, spending several hours at the same spot ready to capture this image. Clear sky, still weather and no moon light allows most of the fine structure of the auroral display to be captured.
In the absence of moon light, the mountains and the sea are illuminated only by the aurora itself. Hence, they take on a green cast. It is indeed breathtaking to experience how the surrounding landscape can be lit up in green by strong aurora outbreaks.
This picture was captured with a Nikon D700 camera and a Nikkor AF-S 14-24mm f/2.8 zoom with some solid support. The lens was shot wide open. The combination of the Nikon FX sensor and the state-of-the-art zoom takes the enjoyment of low light photography to a new level.
'Volcano' won the Stars and Night Sky challenge, the Best Picture Ever challenge, and ended as number 10 in the Challenge of Challenges 2009 at dpreview.com.

shogunpassion:

shogunushuaiaVolcano by Garcia Foto

The picture is taken just outside a small fishing village on the island Senja in Northern Norway. The mountains in the picture raise to about 800 meters above sea level, and they are actually much steeper than suggested by the distorted ultra-wide-angle perspective presented here.

As always, the patient one is eventually rewarded. I have been looking for these conditions for quite some time, spending several hours at the same spot ready to capture this image. Clear sky, still weather and no moon light allows most of the fine structure of the auroral display to be captured.

In the absence of moon light, the mountains and the sea are illuminated only by the aurora itself. Hence, they take on a green cast. It is indeed breathtaking to experience how the surrounding landscape can be lit up in green by strong aurora outbreaks.

This picture was captured with a Nikon D700 camera and a Nikkor AF-S 14-24mm f/2.8 zoom with some solid support. The lens was shot wide open. The combination of the Nikon FX sensor and the state-of-the-art zoom takes the enjoyment of low light photography to a new level.

'Volcano' won the Stars and Night Sky challenge, the Best Picture Ever challenge, and ended as number 10 in the Challenge of Challenges 2009 at dpreview.com.

(Source: scentofushuaia)

Reblogged: braveszone

2 January 11 (Permalink)
fuckyeahvolcanoes:

Erupting Volcano Anak Krakatau. Marco Fulle.
From the image’s page, “In 1927, eruptions caused … Anak Krakatau to rise from the sea, and the emerging volcanic island continues to grow at an average rate of 2 cm per day.”

fuckyeahvolcanoes:

Erupting Volcano Anak Krakatau. Marco Fulle.

From the image’s page, “In 1927, eruptions caused … Anak Krakatau to rise from the sea, and the emerging volcanic island continues to grow at an average rate of 2 cm per day.”

Reblogged: geologyrocks

29 December 10 (Permalink)
travelbyfoldingamap:

The Birth of Earth, Eyjafjallajokull volcano eruption © Terje Sorgjerd

travelbyfoldingamap:

The Birth of Earth, Eyjafjallajokull volcano eruption © Terje Sorgjerd

Reblogged: travelbyfoldingamap

2 November 10 (Permalink)
k-tboundary:

View at dusk of the young Pu‘u ‘O‘o cinder-and-spatter cone, with fountain approximately 40 m high.  Photo taken 6/29/83(By G.E. Ulrich)

k-tboundary:

View at dusk of the young Pu‘u ‘O‘o cinder-and-spatter cone, with fountain approximately 40 m high.  Photo taken 6/29/83
(By G.E. Ulrich)

Reblogged: geologyrocks

18 October 10 (Permalink)
lawgiverz:

ways of nature

lawgiverz:

ways of nature

(Source: candleghost)

Reblogged: frizztastic

27 September 10 (Permalink)
cornersoftheworld:

Mayon Volcano - Bicol, Philippines

cornersoftheworld:

Mayon Volcano - Bicol, Philippines

(Source: cornersoftheworld)

Reblogged: fuckyeahstreetlights

21 September 10 (Permalink)

(Source: racquet-club)

Reblogged: gdaytoyoutoo

13 September 10 (Permalink)
uniformitarianism:

The Door to Hell, Turkmenistan, Darvaza
Derweze (Turkmen language: The Gate, also known as Darvaza) is a Turkmenistan village of about 350 inhabitants, located in the middle of the Kara-Kum desert, about 260 km north from Ashgabat. Darvaza inhabitants are mostly Turkmen of the Teke tribe, preserving a half-nomadic lifestyle.The Derweze area is rich in natural gas. While drilling in 1971 geologists accidentally found an underground cavern filled with natural gas. The ground beneath the drilling rig collapsed, leaving a large hole with a diameter of about 50-100 meters. To avoid poisonous gas discharge, it was decided to burn the gas. Geologists had hoped the fire would go out in a few days but it has been burning ever since. Locals have named the cavern The Door to Hell. Next to capturing the gas, flaring is safer and friendlier to the environment than releasing the methane into the atmosphere as methane is a relatively potent greenhouse gas with a high global warming potential of 72 (averaged over 20 years) or 25 (averaged over 100 years). Turkmenistan plans to increase its production of natural gas. In April 2010, the President of Turkmenistan Gurbanguly Berdimuhamedow visited the site and ordered that the hole should be closed, or other measures be taken to limit its influence on the development of other natural gas fields in the area.

uniformitarianism:

The Door to Hell, Turkmenistan, Darvaza

Derweze (Turkmen language: The Gate, also known as Darvaza) is a Turkmenistan village of about 350 inhabitants, located in the middle of the Kara-Kum desert, about 260 km north from Ashgabat. Darvaza inhabitants are mostly Turkmen of the Teke tribe, preserving a half-nomadic lifestyle.
The Derweze area is rich in natural gas. While drilling in 1971 geologists accidentally found an underground cavern filled with natural gas. The ground beneath the drilling rig collapsed, leaving a large hole with a diameter of about 50-100 meters. To avoid poisonous gas discharge, it was decided to burn the gas. Geologists had hoped the fire would go out in a few days but it has been burning ever since. Locals have named the cavern The Door to Hell. Next to capturing the gas, flaring is safer and friendlier to the environment than releasing the methane into the atmosphere as methane is a relatively potent greenhouse gas with a high global warming potential of 72 (averaged over 20 years) or 25 (averaged over 100 years). Turkmenistan plans to increase its production of natural gas. In April 2010, the President of Turkmenistan Gurbanguly Berdimuhamedow visited the site and ordered that the hole should be closed, or other measures be taken to limit its influence on the development of other natural gas fields in the area.

Reblogged: uniformitarianism

Themed by Hunson. Originally by Josh & tweaked like crazy by Darth Ambiguous